Five Mental Tips for Race Day Success

Ever hear the phrase, “running/walking is 90% mental”? While that may be a bit of hyperbole, there is a lot of truth to the saying. Having a strong mental game on race day can be the difference between cashing in and crapping out on months of hard work and preparation.

Sport psychologists encourage relaxation and visualization during an event. Physiologically relaxed muscles are more fluid, react more quickly, and burn less energy. Relaxed bodies have lower blood lactate levels and allow for greater mental concentration. On the opposite end, when you are experiencing fear and stress, the body becomes tense and tight. Blood flow is directed to the brain, making it harder for the body to perform. Referenced from “Running Within” Jerry Lynch

The following five tips will help you relax and visualize your way to Race Day success!

Tip 1: Breath

There is no consensus on what the best breathing pattern is. I have personally found it helpful to keep my breathing under control as much as possible. If you can be thoughtful about each breathe, it will go a long way; staying relaxed will bring in enough oxygen while also relaxing your mind and body. You can even take this a step further by visualizing clean air circulating through the body with each inhalation, and toxins, stress, and negativity being released with each exhalation.

Tip 2: Body & Face

Remember: staying relaxed and under control is the name of the game. To do that you need to identify and eliminate areas of tension in the body and face. Aim for having loosely cupped hands, relaxed arms, dropped and relaxed shoulders, and a gentle anterior tilt of the head. You also want to relax your face. I typically visualize one of Salvador Dali’s clocks and try to make my face as close to that as possible.

Tip 3: Words

Develop positive mantras and be relentlessly optimistic. I remind myself over and over about all the hard work I have put in and how ready I am. But that is just me. Everyone runs or walks a race for different reasons. Whatever your reason, lean into that! And give yourself plenty of reminders when things are getting tough. I have also found that putting a smile on my face from time to time really helps a lot. After all, this is supposed to be fun!

Tip 4: Images

Using visual images can really help during challenging parts of a race. I typically like to think back to a time when a workout or race went really well and how great I felt. Putting my mind into that positive space helps me will it into existence again. I also like to imagine myself at the moment I cross the finish line and the joy I will feel when I’m done running and my goals have been met. Again, this is just me; mantras should be personal. Find what images motivate you and use them.

Tip 5: Handling Bad Patches

There are several coping strategies that help with handling bad patches during a race. I personally like to break the race into small, manageable chunks – the next mile marker, the next street corner, etc. Focus all your efforts on making it to whatever spot you have picked out in your mind. When you reach the spot you targeted, then choose another and repeat. Other successful tactics include quickening your pace for short bouts of 50-100 meters to change things up, or focusing on your running form to make sure you are maintaining good running posture.

Now that you have the keys to the castle, you should be ready to crush it on race day! If you think I missed anything feel free to share in the comments any strategies that work for you. I also love hearing success stories, so let me know if any of these tips work out for you. Fare well! I wish you the best of luck in your upcoming events!

CNO Financial Group Indianapolis Monumental Marathon & Half Marathon Course Changes 2019

The 12th annual CNO Financial Group Indianapolis Monumental Marathon, Half Marathon & 5K is less than three weeks away! Since the marathon was first run in 2008, it has grown to be one of the 15 largest in the country. It is popular in part because it consistently offers great running weather and a fast course. As both the Half and Full marathon races have grown in size, small tweaks have been made to the courses to make sure participants continue to have experiences matching the high standards that they expect. The 2019 race features four such changes: two each to the Half and Full marathon courses. Without further ado, here is a breakdown of the new CNO Financial Group Indianapolis Monumental Marathon & Half Marathon courses.

Half AND Full Marathon Change:

The first course change affects both the Half and Full marathons between miles 3 and 4. As participants head north on Alabama from New York, instead of turning right on Michigan Street, as was done last year, runners will now pass Michigan and go 1 block farther to North Street, turn right, and head towards Mass Ave. I doubt anyone will really notice this minor change. My impression is that this change adds a little more of a straight away and a slightly easier transition onto Mass Ave.–all good things for fast running!

Half Marathon Change Only:

For the Half Marathon ONLY, between miles 9 and 10, participants heading south on Talbott Street will reach 30th Street and, instead of turning right like in previous years, continue south to turn right on Mapleton Trace toward Meridian. This appears to be a pretty minor change to the course. If anything, it avoids the new Red Line for an extra block and a half. I anticipate this change will be inconsequential.

Full Marathon Change Only:

On the Full marathon course ONLY, as participants approach mile 13, instead of continuing north on College to 66th Street and turning left, they will turn left onto 64th Street and take that to Park Avenue. When marathoners reach Park, they will turn right and head north one block to Riverview Dr. where they will rejoin the traditional course route. This is also a minor change to the previous course. Turning off of College a couple blocks earlier than in previous years will help avoid any potential conflicts with the Red Line turn-around point on 66th Street. I actually run this section pretty frequently and think that, considering the Red Line, this is a very good change and will not negatively impact anyone’s performance.

These are all the course changes for the 2019 CNO Financial Group Indianapolis Monumental Marathon & Half Marathon. If you’ve run or walked either race in the past, the rest of the course is going to be just as fantastic as you remember! If this is your first time participating, then you can view both the entire Half and Full marathon course maps by clicking on this link: Be Monumental Course Map. Good luck to everyone! And make sure to come by the Indy Runners cheer tent post-race. Rumor has it we will be serving breakfast burritos! 😉

Why the Long Run (or Walk)? Or a distance athlete walks into a bar…

For as long as I have been a distance athlete, I’ve done a long run once a week. My first long runs were six grueling miles on the country roads of Bloomington, Indiana as a high school cross country athlete. Nowadays, I can log up to 30 miles during a long run if I’m training for an ultra event. And although it’s practically a distance running cliche, I believe the long run is the most important run of the week.

What is a long run? Why is it so important? What’s going on under the hood, so to speak? And what is up with this bar and where is the bartender? I will try to shed some light on the former three questions, but you’re on your own with the last one. What exactly is a long run and what you are getting out of it?

Author’s note: While I am using the term “long run” throughout this post, please note that the same training guidelines and physiological concepts apply if you are a distance walker and not a runner! Get after it!

What is a “long run”?

The short answer: it’s the longest run of the week. Shocking, I know. The distance and duration will vary depending on the race you’re training for. If you are training for a half marathon, your long run will be less than someone’s who is training for a marathon. In order to facilitate the necessary physiological changes for performing well at longer distances (i.e. full- and half-marathons), the total time of a long run should be more than 90-105 minutes regardless of pace.

Why are “long runs” important? And what’s going on under the hood?

  • Energy Efficiency: Running long distances improves your body’s ability to store glycogen (energy in the form of stored carbohydrates), handle glycogen depletion (when your body starts to run low on fuel), manage muscle fatigue, and use fat in conjunction with glycogen as energy.
  • Muscle Adaptation: During your long run, the cells that make up your muscles increase in size by adding more fibers (the parts that contract) and mitochondria (the parts of the cells that use oxygen to generate energy). There is also an increase in enzymes–which ultimately increases the rate at which delivered oxygen can be used to create energy. And finally, more capillaries become active within exercising muscles, delivering oxygen to and removing waste from them more efficiently.
  • Running Economy: Simply put, running long increases your body’s ability to utilize oxygen more efficiently.
  • Aerobic Capacity: Most runners, especially new runners, are greatly held back by their lack of aerobic capacity (a measure of efficiency, as described above). The biggest gains you can make in overall performance come with increasing aerobic capacity, and running long is one of the best ways to do that.
  • Mental Toughness: News Flash — When running long distances, there is likely some amount of discomfort that you have to manage. If this hasn’t been your experience, I would suggest maybe running farther or faster. Anyway, the more you run long the better you will be at handling the discomfort–emotionally and physically.
  • Specificity of Training: This means that the system you stress is the system that improves. So basically, if you are training for a long distance race, you are going to get the most benefit from running long distances. Micheal Jordan didn’t become a great basketball player by riding a bike!

Final Thoughts and A Word of Warning

So now that I’ve unlocked all the mysteries behind the long run (or walk), you’re ready to get out there and go for as long as you can the next chance you get, right? Unfortunately, it doesn’t quite work like that. To minimize your risk of injury, you need to build up your long run over time and in a responsible manner. That means that if the longest you’ve ever run is 6 miles, it’s probably not a good idea to go out for 16 miles tomorrow. A good training program (especially for newer runners) will increase your long run duration over the course of a training cycle (e.g. 12-16 weeks for a half- or full-marathon) and typically have 1 recovery week per month where the distance of your long run is decreased.

I hope that this information has helped you better understand why it is beneficial to incorporate a long run or walk into your training and what you are getting out of it. If you think I got something wrong or left something out, be sure to let me know in the comments. Also, if you liked this blog post, next time you see me out in the real world shout “Mitochondria!” so I know you read the whole thing!

Running & Walking Nutrition Basics

I vividly remember the moment I started to appreciate the relationship between food and running. It was my freshman year of high school (Go Panthers!) when I discovered both distance running and gyros at the exact same time. I thought gyros were the perfect lunch–until I ate one on the same day as a track workout. Let’s just say that after that day my relationship with gyros changed forever. And my understanding of how to properly eat before a workout (and why) got a little better.

My next big revelation about nutrition and its impact on running came after college when I started running longer and longer distances (marathons and ultra marathons). Luckily, I had an experienced distance-running coach who explained the importance of in-race nutrition and its impact on performance. Even after 26 marathons and a half dozen or so ultra marathons in just over a decade, I am still playing with what works best for my body during long running events.

While I am not claiming to be a Sports Nutritionist, I do have a lot of experience when it comes to seeking out and finding the right fuel for my endurance events of choice. This is probably the topic that gets brought up the most when I talk with new half- and full-marathon runners.

If you are planning to run a race of ninety minutes or more and you are not thinking about a nutrition plan, you might want to start!

Below are some basic rules of thumb that I follow. Keep in mind that everyone is different and it is important to experiment and figure out what works best for you.

Nutrition Pre-Exercise or Pre-Race: (Source: Cassie Dimmick)

  • Shorter weekday workouts: eat 30-60 min before
  • Longer weekend workouts or competition: eat 2-3 hours before (Don’t worry about waking up that early before the long run unless you are simulating race day. Eat well the night before and snack 30-45 minutes before running.)
  • Choose a meal or snack that is low in fat, contains complex carbohydrates, and has a little protein.
  • Rule of Half: half a bagel, half a banana, half a cup of coffee, etc
  • Eat familiar foods that you know you can tolerate
  • Practice leading up to a long distance race
  • Drink 10-16 oz of fluid 1-2 hours before exercise and another 4-8 oz right before you start.

Pre-Exercise food examples:

  • Granola bar and a banana
  • English muffin or bagel with peanut butter and a piece of fruit
  • Smoothie
  • Nutrition Bar
  • Gel or Sports Chews
  • Pretzels

Nutrition During Exercise or Race: (Source: Cassie Dimmick)

  • Muscles use glycogen (the stored energy form of carbohydrates) and fat for fuel. Both fat and glycogen are used in most activities. Fat can be used as a fuel during aerobic exercise (long, low intensity exercise), but glycogen is the main fuel during strenuous exercise (running a half or full marathon) and anaerobic exercise (short bursts of all-out running).
  • For exercise over 90 minutes, you need additional carbs from gels, bars, or other well-tolerated foods.
  • For runs up to 120 minutes, 30 to 60 grams of carbs per hour of exercise is helpful.
  • For runs over 120 minutes, aim for 60-90 grams per hour as tolerated.

Examples of approximately 30 Grams of carbohydrate:

  • 1 banana
  • 10 pretzels
  • 2 Fig Newtons
  • 1/4 bagel
  • Gels and Sports Chews (Note: Gels and chews have roughly 22 to 29 grams of carbs per serving along with electrolytes. Take these with water to speed delivery of energy into your system.)

Nutrition Post Exercise or Race:

To become a better runner or walker you need to recover from running or walking. For proper recovery, it is recommended that you eat something with both carbohydrates and protein within 45 minutes to an hour after exercise. Failing to do so will most likely effect recovery time and limit the the improvements you can gain from your workout. Failing to recover not only can hinder potential benefits from exercise, but also can lead to injury over time. Read more about the science behind post-exercise recovery in this report by the American Council on Exercise.

I hope this article helps you answer some of your basic sports nutrition questions. At the very least, I hope it gets you thinking about the subject if you have not been already. If this is something you are really fascinated by and think it is the edge you need, I would recommend going to see a Sports Nutritionist to learn more. And remember, we are all different, so it’s important to experiment and find out what works best for your body.

2019 Erika Wells Memorial Scholarship Co-Winner Katie Manion

For four years in a row, Indy Runners has awarded two $500 scholarships to local high school graduates whose lives have been positively impacted by the sport of running. This years’ winners are Jada Coleman from Ben Davis High School and Katie Manion from North Central High School.

Erika Wells, who the scholarship is named after, was a beloved member of Indy Runners who passed away in October 2016. Her dedication to service, personal growth, and social engagement was unparalleled, and she embodied Indy Runners’ belief in the transformative power of running as part of a healthy lifestyle and a way to unify a community. The Erika Wells Scholarship is awarded to high school graduates who exemplify these characteristics.

Katie Manion (North Central High School)

Katie was a member of the North Central Panthers cross country team all four years and a team captain for the 2018-19 season. She also ran track her freshman and sophomore years of high school and competed in the Mini Marathon in 2016. She graduated with a 4.379 grade point average and will be attending Saint Louis University in the fall.

Each scholarship applicant was asked to write and submit an essay on how they came to love running, what the sport of running means to them, or how they believe running will impact their future. We are happy to share Katie’s essay below.

At the age of seven, my parents signed me up for my elementary school’s running club. At the age of eight, I ran my first 5k. By the time I was nine, my neighbor and I were running around our neighborhood together on a daily basis. When I was 11, I completed my first cross country season at Eastwood Middle School, and I loved every minute of it. At this point in my life, running kept me going. It gave me something to look forward to after school, a way to release my negative emotions, and a way to keep my growing body strong.

Right before my 12th birthday, I found myself in the hospital at Riley. I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. While sitting in my bed, my doctors rattled off the dangers of running and the precautions that I would need to take in order to be able to continue to practice the sport I love. I was told that running would become incredibly challenging and that I would have to wear monitors while on the move to ensure my safety. I would have to take lengthy breaks between reps and space out my workouts to keep my glucose levels stable. They told me it would be hard to get faster. I made varsity the next year. And the year after that. I did not let myself become defined by my diagnosis and I refused to let it slow me down.

As I went into high school, my body began to slow down as my disease became harder to control. It became evident that maintaining the speed that I had known for so long would be nearly impossible. Freshmen year was the most difficult. Not only was I trying to find my place on the team socially, but I was watching myself fall behind my peers in practice. By the time the first meet rolled around, I was nowhere close to making varsity. I was having to sit out of practice two or three times a week, and it was honestly humiliating. I always felt like people thought I was a slacker or uncommitted, but in reality, I was just sick.

Before this point, I loved running for the competition. I loved collecting my ribbons and hanging up medals in my room. However, I was no longer able to compete at the level that I had in the past. I began to receive less and less medals, and my bulletin board full of ribbons did not become any more impressive. But during this time, I began to love running more and more. It reminded me that I was still strong, and it still does. Though I cannot run everyday, I feel unstoppable when I am able to. It has taught me that I do not need to be the fastest to be the happiest, and that is all that matters.

Remember, if you think you know a deserving young candidate for the 2020 Erika Wells Scholarship, encourage them to apply this upcoming winter/spring!

2019 Erika Wells Memorial Scholarship Co-Winner Jada Coleman

For four years in a row, Indy Runners has awarded two $500 scholarships to local high school graduates whose lives have been positively impacted by the sport of running. This years’ winners are Jada Coleman from Ben Davis High School and Katie Manion from North Central High School.

Erika Wells, who the scholarship is named after, was a beloved member of Indy Runners who passed away in October 2016. Her dedication to service, personal growth, and social engagement was unparalleled, and she embodied Indy Runners’ belief in the transformative power of running as part of a healthy lifestyle and a way to unify a community. The Erika Wells Scholarship is awarded to high school graduates who exemplify these characteristics.

Jada Coleman (Ben Davis High School)

Jada was a four-year varsity Track and Field athlete for the Ben Davis Giants. She ran the 4 x 100 relay, the 4 x 400 relay, and the 300 intermediate hurdles. In addition to Track and Field, she was a four-year varsity basketball player and a three-year member of the volleyball team. She graduated last May with a 3.92 grade point average and will be attending Marshall University this fall.

Each scholarship applicant was asked to write and submit an essay on how they came to love running, what the sport of running means to them, or how they believe running will impact their future. We are happy to share Jada’s essay below.

I fell flat on my face and attempted to run again. I did not get to the finish line in time to secure my place but I did not give up. I was in first place. I clipped a hurdle during the Girls’ Track and Field 2017 Sectional Championship at Ben Davis High School on my last hurdle.

The next season I worked ten times harder than I already had. When I felt like giving up and wanted to stop during workouts, I replayed falling over the hurdle in my head and remembered that I had to redeem myself from the past year. I studied videos of professional hurdlers, worked out during my off-season, and worked on staying on my tippy toes while running. I had a great season and now it was time for Sectionals again. It was such a larger crowd than before and it was almost as if more people had come my junior year just to see me fall again. I told myself I was not going to fail and was more ready than ever. By the end of my race in 300 meter hurdles, I got a personal record and became the 2018 Sectional Champion!

This whole experience was very chaotic, sadly, but it gave me the knowledge of believing in myself even if thousands of people do not. It made me learn how to have self-confidence and gave me a reason to never give up on something no matter how many times I fail. After an experience like that, most weak-minded runners would have quit. I faced my mistakes and improved upon them.

The adrenaline running gives me makes me push myself more and more. I love running so much that even when it felt like I did not belong on the track anymore, one more workout and one more result reassured me of the reasons why I do belong on a track. I have come to realize that it is not always about running perfect races, it is how you finish. My love for running drove me into a mindset that anything is possible when you have faith. I had faith in myself and went out there the next year and surprised everyone watching me run. They did not expect me to get that far knowing how I performed in the previous year.

Love conquers all. When you love something and want it you will do anything in your power to go and get it. I went after what I wanted. I knew that I loved to run and that it was my destiny to be on the track so I was going to show everyone why they should believe in me the way I did. I love the wind in my face, the soreness after a workout, and that my body aches are a symbol that it all will pay off. I love running and I realized that when I failed but kept trying. Loving to run is in my blood.

Make sure to check out our next blog post, as it will feature this year’s other winner: Katie Manion from North Central High School. And if you think you know a deserving young candidate for the 2020 Erika Wells Scholarship, encourage them to apply this upcoming winter/spring!

Indy Runners & Walkers Member Spotlight: Carole Miller

You might recognize Carole Miller, (standing in the center of the featured photo above), as one of the smiling faces serving breakfast burritos and pancakes at our cheer zone tent after the Monumental Marathon. Or, perhaps you know her from our Spring Training Program where she takes new walkers under her wing and keeps them coming back week after week with her encouragement and wonderful sense of humor. Carole has also served the past two years on the Indy Runners board as the co-walking director. Her self proclaimed mission has been “to give a face to walkers, because they are just as passionate about walking as runners are about running–it just takes us longer.”

Having served on the board with Carole the past two years, I can honestly say she is the perfect representation of what makes our club special. She is always looking out for others and making sure everyone feels welcome and appreciated. I couldn’t think of anyone better to do our very first member spotlight blog post with than Carole, who truly makes Indy Runners and Walkers a place for every pace!

Below are a series of questions Carole took the time to answer for us.

When and why did you join Indy Walkers?

I joined Indy Runners in 2013. I was looking for a training program for the 500 Mini. The last year I attempted to do the Mini was 2003. To put it mildly, it was the most miserable and painful experience of my life and it took me 10 years to try it again. I knew my training in 2003 was insufficient and I had to do better, so I went on the internet and Indy Runners popped up as a local running club.

What kept you coming back?

The reason I kept coming back was because of Kay King and Sue Murry.  Both of these wonderful women took me under their wing in 2013 and walked with me. Although their pace was much faster than mine, they made sure that I was never alone. They are part of the reason that I always tell the new walkers our motto: “No one is left behind.” The training is fine and the seminars are helpful, but you can pull down a training schedule from the web and get what you need. The most important thing for me was the camaraderie of our walking group. Sue and Kay and anyone who walks with me has heard about my WONDERFUL grandson, my crazy sister, my stressful job, and my cancer.  These wonderful people are always there to listen. That’s why I get up on Saturdays and go across town to Broad Ripple to walk 6 miles. I could walk in Eagle Creek, but Eagle Creek would not have the wonderful people I’ve met training with Indy Walkers.

Left to right: Natasha Jones, Kay Greene, Carole Miller

When were you diagnosed with cancer and what is your current status?

I was diagnosed with Stage 1 Breast Cancer in January 2018. The first people I told were my walking buddies. First, because it was the start of the 2018 training for the Mini and I would not be able to continue as a pacer, and second, because they were my walking buddies and after five years I told them everything. When I was diagnosed I had grand plans; I wasn’t going to let cancer dictate to me how I was going to live my life. I was determined to keep my walking routine. I received so much love and support from everyone in the Club, and not just my close walking buddies, but runners that I only knew in passing. I don’t think I would have had such a successful recovery without my buddies at Indy Walkers. They laughed with me about my bald head and the side effects of chemo, and when it came time for “slice and dice” also known as surgery, Kay and Sue provided me with meals so that I would not have to cook. I will never be able to thank them enough.  I truly believe that one of the main factors in my successful recovery is that I was in good health. I contribute that to walking three times a week: 3 to 4 miles on two days and 6 miles on Saturdays.

What is your most memorable Indy Walkers moment?

Believe it or not my most memorable moment with Indy Walkers is walking up Holcomb Hill without stopping! I complain a lot and on that first attempt at Holcomb I was complaining at the top of my lungs. The first time, I had to stop 3 times and at the end, my lungs were burning, my heart was beating so fast I thought I would die, and the words coming out of my mouth would put anyone to shame–but at the time, I didn’t care. Five years later, I can make it in one try! I still breath hard, but I don’t stop. I still complain, but not as robustly. And I really don’t have that much time to complain because it doesn’t take that long for me to do it. That just tells you how successful my time with Indy Walkers has been in improving my health.

What does Indy Walkers mean to you?

Indy Walkers and walking are part of my life. Want to make me mad? Tell me I have to work on Tuesday or Thursday evenings or Saturday morning. Want to get on my bad side? Keep me from making a race that I paid for in January. I spend more money on shoes for walking then casual or dress shoes. Sometimes I feel like the Post Office: nothing–and I mean nothing–keeps me from my Saturday morning walks. If I don’t make it on Saturday, my entire weekend is messed up.

What would you tell someone thinking about joining Indy Walkers?

I really think Indy Runners/Walkers is a great club for anyone wanting to train for races or just get in shape. I’ve tried training on my own and it was not a good choice for me. I’ve tried walking by myself and it doesn’t work. The accountability, camaraderie, and sheer fun of seeing myself improve keep me getting up every Saturday morning. On top of that, talking with my buddies beats spending money on a shrink. Without Indy Walkers, I never would have met Pam or Natasha, or Sharon and her brother, Karen and Kathy, or Chris and Laura. And without Sue and Kay, I never would have survived that first year. Throw in the facts that my health has improved, I can walk Holcomb in one attempt, and I’ve seen parts of Indianapolis I never would have seen without Indy Walkers, and you have the reasons I continue to come back and would recommend it to anyone.

What are some of your proudest walking accomplishments?

My proudest walking accomplishment is going to sound insane. One year it was bitter cold. Elizabeth, Sue, and I decided that we were going to walk that Thursday. It was 5 degrees outside. Our vow was that if we could walk 1 mile we would reward ourselves with dinner at 317 Burger. That night I wore 2 pairs of socks, 2 shirts, 2 pairs of pants, 1 jacket, 2 pairs of gloves, and a hat and scarf. At the .5 mile mark, we looked at each other and said, “Let’s keep walking.” At the 1 mile mark, we kept going, all the way to 75th street. That night, I knew I was crazy but had accomplished something special. I walked 3 miles in 5 degree weather with two of my crazy walking buddies. I’ll never forget that night. So regardless of how wet, hot, or cold it is, I try to walk. Ice is the one element that I’ll say no to: broken bones aren’t any fun. Also, any time I finish a race and I’m not the last walker crossing the finish line is great.

What races do you currently have lined up?

In 2019 I have only one goal: to finish the races I’ve signed up for. I’ve done the Mini and received my medal. I’ve signed up for all five 317-Series races: that’s 5 medals. I’m making plans to complete the Wright Patterson Air Force Half (1 medal), Fort Ben 5K (another medal) and the Women’s 5K (yet another medal). The goal this year is to get as many medals as I can and not be asked to leave a course. So far, I’m on track. I will start to improve my time and pace next year, but right now I’m just glad to be alive and glad I have my walking buddies to help me along the way.

Thank you Carole for letting us all get to know you better! You are truly inspiring and represent the club so well.

If you know someone that you think should be featured in a future blog post, email Jesse at blog@indyrunners.org.